Anaesthesia Information Page

Anaesthesia Terminology


[ Home | Anaesthesia | Anaesthetist | Anesthesiologist | Consultant | Specialist | Registrar | Fellow | Resident | Intern ]

HOME
FAQ
  Drips
  Fasting
  Smoking
  Alcohol & Drugs
  Death
  Sleep
  Differences
  Residual Effects
  Nausea
OPERATION
  Preparation
  Preadmission
  Medications
  Before surgery
  Surgery
  After surgery
  Discharge
  More information
CHOICES
  General
  Regional
  Sedation
   Pros & Cons
DRIPS
  Intravenous line
  Urinary catheter
  Nasogastric
  Arterial line
  Central Line
PAIN
  Why pain?
  How much?
  Harmful?
  Relief
  Tablets
  Intramuscular
  Intravenous
  Addiction
  Epidurals
  Other
PREGNANCY
  Anaesthesia
  Childbirth
  Pain relief
  Choice
  Caesarean
  Breast feeding
TERMINOLOGY
  Anaesthesia
  Anaesthetist
  Anesthesiologist
  Consultant
  Specialist
  Registrar
  Fellow
  Resident
  Intern
ABOUT
  Purpose
  Design
  Author
  Disclaimer
  Credits
  Copyright
Anaesthesia
What does anaesthesia mean?

Anaesthesia is a word derived from the greek which literally translated means lack of feeling. More accurately, it describes both having no feeling in the literal sense and no emotion; not caring. This is quite an accurate description of the state induced during an operation as simply being unconscious ("asleep") is not necessarily what it is about. There are numerous other ways to have an operation and regardless of what anaesthetic option is chosen by your anaesthesia provider, the part of your body that will be operated on will be made to have no feeling (see regional anaesthesia) and you will be made calm and uncaring about your surroundings.

Back to Top


Anaesthetist
Who is an anaesthetist?

This is a general term describing the person who provides your anaesthetic. In Australia it usually refers to a consultant or a registrar, who are doctors either fully specialised or training as such. In country areas it is not unusual for general practitioners to be trained in anaesthesia also. The name anaesthetist is not used to describe a medical specialist in the United States.

Back to Top


Anesthesiologist
Why not an anesthesiologist?

This is an American term for a anaesthetist. Likewise the American spelling for anaesthesia is anesthesia.

Back to Top


Consultant
What makes someone a consultant?

A consultant is a person who serves as the highest level of anaesthesia provider and has responsibility for any anaesthetic administered. A consultant is a specialised doctor and therefore the term specialist is interchangeable with consultant. They have been recognised as a specialist by the Australian & New Zealand College of Anaesthetists for completing appropriate training requirements. A specialist anaesthetist in Australia has completed 6 years of medicine training, worked as a resident medical officer for at least two years prior to commencing training in Anaesthesia and then trained for at least five years prior to becoming a consultant. Thus an anaesthetist has completed medical school and has been a doctor for at least seven years - coming to a grand total of at least thirteen years of training. Different parts of the world have different training requirements.

Back to Top


Specialist
What is a specialist?

This is a term simply meaning specialised doctor and is often used interchangeably with consultant, as a consultant in medicine is a specialist.

Back to Top


Registrar
Who are these registrars?

A registrar is a trainee specialist. They have been working as resident doctors for a nominal time prior to becoming a registrar. As registrar they work full time as doctors in public hospitals and receive additional training coordinated by their hospital training program and examinations supervised by the Australian & New Zealand College of Anaesthetists. They receive different levels of supervision by consultants according to the complexity of the anaesthetic and their level of experience, but always have a consultant anaesthetist responsible for every anaesthetic they administer.

Back to Top


Fellow
A jolly good fellow?

The term fellow refers to one who has been recognised by the college of anaesthetists for reaching the appropriate level to be considered a specialist - the title FANZCA means diploma of Fellowship of the Australian & New Zealand College of Anaesthetists. Often, however, the term fellow is used to describe a provisional fellow who is a registrar who has completed their examinations and the first four years of their training and is doing a year in Anaesthesia in an area they have chosen as a stepping stone into a specialist role.

Back to Top


Resident
Why are they called residents?

A resident is a Resident Medical Officer or RMO. They are doctors who are not specialised and are dedicated to working within the hospital system allocated to work in a particular speciality. They used to be the doctors that were always in the hospital so they were called Residents. They are also called Hospital Medical Officers or HMO.

Back to Top


Intern
When is a doctor an intern?

An intern is a doctor who has just finished their medical degree and is completing their first year as a doctor in a heavily supervised hospital role. They usually rotate within different specialities. Thus they are a first year resident.

Gallery
 
adu image
Anaesthetic machine (Click for larger image)
 

  Back to Top Site created by Con Kolivas Jan 2001
 

[ Home | Anaesthesia | Anaesthetist | Anesthesiologist | Consultant | Specialist | Registrar | Fellow | Resident | Intern ]